Tag Archives: Protect mortgage payments

Gross mortgage lending continues to rise, hitting £18.9 billion in January

 

According to the latest Council of Mortgage Lenders’ (CML) report, gross mortgage lending for January is estimated at £18.9 billion, up 2% compared to a year ago.

Other highlights included:

  • First-time buyer numbers continue to recover in 2016, but home mover numbers remain weak
  • The Housing White Paper was recently published but is unlikely to have an impact on the housing market this year

THE ECONOMY

Driven predominantly by consumer spending, the economy grew 1.8% in 2016, prompting the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) to revise up growth for 2017 to just above that of 2016, at 2.0%, within the February Inflation Report.

CML stated that: “…inflation poses a risk to consumer spending as it continues to rise this year and is expected to peak at 2.8% by around this time next year. The latest figures show inflation reached 1.8% in January and there are already signs that it is putting pressure on consumer spending, as retail sales in January contracted for the first time in over three years.”

The economy is still creating jobs, with the employment rate of people aged from 16 to 64 who were in work at 74.6%, the highest since comparable records began in 1971.

HOUSING

House purchase approvals seem to be increasing, having reached 68,000 in December 2016, a marked increase on December 2015, which saw a low of 61,000. Due to these promising figures, the MPC has revised up its forecast to 71,000 per month.

CML added that: “We don’t have a breakdown of lending yet for January, but given recent trends, it looks likely to show that first-time buyers and remortgage activity continue to be the drivers of lending.”

“CML regional data shows in some areas, such as greater London, the number of home movers fell to their lowest levels for 25 years, highlighting the acuteness of this issue. The imbalance is likely to continue underpinning house price values.”

REGULATION

The Housing White Paper was published earlier this month and announced that a lot of small adjustments were needed to fix the chronic housing shortage. The impact of which, is not expected to be seen until 2018 and beyond.

Landlords will be subject to new tax relief changes for buy-to-let properties in two months, as part of a four-year transition.

Henry Knight, Managing Director, Springtide Capital commented: “We do not expect a surge of activity prior to this change, however, many landlords are already planning ahead in order to reduce the impact. I would encourage anyone who requires a mortgage to invest in a buy-to-let property to contact a member of the Springtide Capital team on 020 3040 4400.”

 

The mortgage process – what’s involved

Mortgage process

Sarah Logeswaran, a first-time buyer from London, recently sent Springtide Capital some positive feedback as follows:

“Springtide Capital’s extensive knowledge and experience, coupled with their approachable and friendly nature, really eased me through the process of purchasing my first home.”

We thrive on feedback at Springtide Capital, as it helps us to continually improve the service we offer.  We’re thrilled that Sarah was happy with the high level of service she received and it’s something we strive for with all our clients, as we know that getting a mortgage is one of the most stressful things you can go through. We’re proud of the service we give and that’s why we’d like to help new clients to understand what they can expect from us when purchasing their first property.

Henry Knight, Director of Springtide Capital has also provided his tips on key broker qualities.

  1. The initial meeting

A client’s perspective: The client initially approaches Springtide Capital to obtain a mortgage for a property they have set their sights on. Although the majority of clients are savvy with their finances, the mortgage market is baffling and clients often require guidance on what they can afford and the types of mortgages available. Non-advised sales of mortgages are now not available so a client must seek financial advice.

Moreover, clients usually prefer face-to-face meetings with a broker, rather than a call centre adviser, due to the private nature of the questions, which must be answered. It also provides the client with more options, as the broker isn’t tied to a specific lender, and gives them a point of contact to guide them through the mortgage process.

A face-to-face meeting is then arranged and our Mortgage Consultant will go through their client’s requirements, financial situation and explains the application process and the types of mortgages available.

Springtide Capital’s perspective: The mortgage industry is heavily regulated, and it’s vital that the Mortgage Consultant can demonstrate (document) that any recommended mortgage fits his/her client’s personal circumstances and is affordable in the event of rate rises – protecting the client.

Henry’s tip: “A mortgage consultant should take the time to understand a client’s circumstances on the first meeting. They must then clearly explain the process and then make sure the client understands the financial commitment they’re undertaking.”

  1. The key facts documents

A client’s perspective: The client will then receive a Key Facts Illustration (KFI) document, explaining, in detail, the type of mortgage recommended (including interest rate, the overall Annual Percentage Rate of Charge (APRC), the monthly payment and any fees), the total amount payable over the term of the mortgage and next steps they’ll go through if they wish to proceed.

Springtide Capital’s perspective: This is where our Mortgage Consultant’s experience really comes into play. Using all of their knowledge of the market, regulation and lender relationships they will have researched the deals available that best fits the client’s needs before issuing a KFI. They will also take into account any additional challenges that the client may face when applying for the mortgage e.g. any restrictions they might have that could make getting a mortgage difficult and place the business with lenders who specialise in such cases.

Henry’s tip:“A mortgage consultant should have an in-depth understanding of the mortgage market in order to find a mortgage which best fits the client’s circumstances. They also need to know how to structure a proposal to a mortgage lender especially where the client’s circumstances are outside of the standard criteria.“

  1. The Agreement In Principle (AIP)

A client’s perspective: The client is given an AIP by the lender and details are sent out to read and discuss with the Mortgage Consultant. The client can then place an offer on the property. Once the offer on the property is agreed, our Mortgage Consultant will then submit a formal application with full information to the lender.

Springtide Capital’s perspective: This is a crucial part of the process as an AIP is only based on information provided by the client. To obtain a mortgage the Mortgage Consultant must then evidence the facts provided by his/her client e.g. proof of income, bank statements etc. It’s then vital that everyone in the process is kept up to date with progress until exchange of contracts and money is transferred from the lender. This is often the most stressful part of the mortgage process and that’s where our Mortgage Consultants really come into their own. They will liaise with their client, the lender, solicitor and estate agent to ensure that all the documentation is received and will often be the first point of contact if things don’t go as smoothly as planned. They will work hard with all parties to make sure their client gets the resolution they need, with as little hassle as possible.

Henry’s tip:“A mortgage consultant should keep all parties updated with progress, whether they are the client, lender, estate agent or solicitor. They should be available throughout the process and proactively resolve any problems that crop up.”

 

If you would like to speak to a Springtide Capital mortgage broker please call

020 3040 4400.

Half of mortgage holders have no life cover

 

Springtide Capital have been helping mortgage holders to protect themselves and their families with life assurance and critical illness cover for many years. However, no matter how great the benefit and peace of mind, our experience tells us that any additional expense reduces willingness to take out insurance policies.

 This has recently been reflected in research from Scottish Widows, stating that “50% of the UK’s mortgage holders have no life cover in place, meaning that 8.2 million people are leaving themselves and their families financially exposed if the unforeseen were to happen.”

It’s critical

The research also revealed that “only a fifth (20%) of the UK’s mortgage holders have a critical illness policy, leaving many more millions at risk of financial hardship or losing their home if they were to become seriously ill.”

When you purchase a life and critical illness policy, you’re actually buying peace of mind so that mortgage payments will be met, which is often the last thing you or your family would like to manage when illness strikes or worse.

Springtide Capital have two dedicated and experienced Protection Consultants, Andrew and Jackie.

They will take the time to understand your circumstances, ask any relevant health questions and provide a quotation, which is tailored to your needs – ensuring that you and your family are protected.

Jackie, Protection Consultant at Springtide Capital, commented: “I consider life and critical illness extremely important when you take out a mortgage or other loans. Although it isn’t a condition of a mortgage application, lenders do like to understand that you have considered the consequences of not taking one out. It really is better to be safe than sorry.”

Living on a single income

33% of respondents admitted “that if they or their partner were unable to work for six months or longer due to ill health or personal injury, they’d be unable to live on a single income.

“And more than two-fifths (43%) of those who couldn’t cope with a single wage say they would resort to dipping into their savings in order to survive. Yet 43% say their savings would last for no more than a couple of months and 15% don’t even know how much they have, meaning they could be relying on backup which doesn’t actually exist.”

Three months and counting

In addition, “just under a quarter (23%) could only afford to pay household bills for a maximum of three months if they or their partner were unable to work, and 23% could make a maximum of just three monthly mortgage payments. Another 15% admit they’re not actually sure how long they’d be able to cope with their mortgage payments.

“Welfare reforms make the case for financial protection all the more pressing. A quarter (25%) of mortgage holders who say they’d be unable to live on a single income if their partner were unable to work also admit that they’d rely on state benefits to ensure they could manage financially.”

Henry Knight, director at Springtide Capital, added: “I’d urge mortgage holders to seek advice on protecting themselves should the worst happen. A quote can be produced very quickly and tailored to the budget level of the client. Cover becomes priceless when it’s required.”

To find out how we can help you with your mortgage protection needs simply call 020 3040 4400.

SOURCE: Scottish Widows Research June 2016